Common pregnancy myths and misconceptions

Pregnant women are given lots of advice surrounding healthy eating and lifestyle, but this is often based on old or outdated information. There are so many myths and misconceptions floating around that it can be difficult for mums-to-be to tell fact from fiction. Here are our tips and guidance, so you can feel confident about having a healthy pregnancy.

Pregnant women should ‘eat for two’
It’s a common belief that a pregnant woman can expect to ‘eat for two’! But overeating can place both you and your baby at risk of health problems. Eating a healthy, balanced diet is what’s important. The Department of Health recommends that calorie intake should increase by 200kcal per day but only in the third trimester.

Avoid coffee and tea during pregnancy
Excess caffeine intake has been shown to increase the risk of low birth weight, but it doesn’t need to be cut out altogether! Moderate consumption is safe, with the recommended amount being 200mg/day – about the same as two mugs of instant coffee or tea.

Eating peanuts will cause your baby to have allergies
It is perfectly safe to eat peanuts (or any nuts!) unless you are allergic to them yourself. 

Avoid eating fish during pregnancy
Two servings of cooked fish a week (one of which should be oily) is a healthy way of consuming vital omega-3 fatty acids. Raw fish, however, should be avoided due to the risk of food poisoning. Swordfish, shark and marlin should also be avoided due to high mercury levels. 

A small baby means an easier birth
Giving birth to a small baby will not necessarily be easier. The pelvis expands to allow the delivery of babies of all sizes.

Eating spicy foods can induce labour
There is no scientific evidence to support this common pregnancy myth.

Avoid exercise during pregnancy
It’s best for you and the baby to stay active during pregnancy. Moderate exercise helps keep pregnant women fit, reduces complications of pregnancy and labour, and helps restore body shape after birth. Like all adults, pregnant women should aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity on five or more days per week. 

Smoking and drinking will not harm the baby
Smoking is the biggest risk-factor for sudden infant death, and increases the risk of stillbirth, premature birth, miscarriage and low birth weight babies. The safest approach is not to smoke or drink alcohol at all to keep risks to your baby to a minimum. Even small amounts of alcohol consumption can lead to long-term harm for your baby and the more alcohol consumed, the bigger the risk.

Found this helpful? Why not share with your family and friends? And for further information on a healthy diet and lifestyle during pregnancy, read more at Ten Steps for a Healthy Pregnancy.

Posted in BlogTagged , ,

Further Reading

  • Nothing describes a rollercoaster more accurately than the early months with your newborn baby. With the rush of love and amazing bonding experience that many new parents feel also comes numerous unknowns and challenges which can cause high levels of anxiety. Not always having the answer or being unsure of where to look for trusted information can naturally leave some parents feeling stressed and overwhelmed.
  • Vegetarian and vegan diets have become increasingly popular over the past few years, with more and more parents raising their children on a plant-based diet. Toddlers have high-energy needs and small stomachs, so it is important parents know how to ensure their child gets all the nutrients needed for healthy growth and development. The Infant & Toddler Forum are here to help with practical tips and advice for parents considering a vegetarian or vegan diet for their toddler.
  • Encouraging toddlers to keep physically active will help them to develop movement skills, stay a healthy weight and keep a healthy heart. No matter the weather, we have fun activities which will keep your toddler active and entertained this Easter!